tastefullyoffensive:

Reversed GIFs [via]

Previously: Animals Being Jerks

lik0vacs:

Hyrule Warriors Zelda:

Had two weeks to complete.
Full costume, props, ears and accessories made by me. I made the armor out of thermoplastics and foam and the gold designs in the skirt took about 16 hours. There was lots of sewing, building, sanding, bondo, and paint, along with lots of blood sweat and tears to get this done on time.
More on my
facebook: Li Kovacs

You can watch my Making of video here: http://youtu.be/s4X7bynulww

Amaze

biodiverseed:

mattdoux:

hkirkh:

If you’re anything like me, you have to keep your future self in line.

Omg

I feel this on a spiritual level

taintspiration

biodiverseed:

mattdoux:

hkirkh:

If you’re anything like me, you have to keep your future self in line.

Omg

I feel this on a spiritual level

taintspiration
dogshaming:

I have a steak in this relationship

I hadn’t had a stake in a long time. So I purchased a nice T-bone and put it in a marinade.

dogshaming:

I have a steak in this relationship

I hadn’t had a stake in a long time. So I purchased a nice T-bone and put it in a marinade.

iguanamouth:

the fourth set of commissioned unusual dragon hoards ! looks like the breakfast and comic book hoarders might be cousins huh ? ? 

(part 1) (part 2) (part 3)

A study on masculinity and aggression from the University of South Florida found that innocuous – yet feminine – tasks could produce profound anxiety in men. As part of the study, a group of men were asked to perform a stereotypically feminine act – braiding hair in this case - while a control group braided rope. Following the act, the men were given the option to either solve a puzzle or punch a heavy bag. Not surprisingly, the men who performed the task that threatened their masculinity were far more likely to punch the bag; again, violence serving as a way to reestablish their masculine identity. A follow-up had both groups punch the bag after braiding either hair or rope; the men who braided the hair punched the bag much harder. A third experiment, all the participants braided hair, but were split into two groups: those who got to punch the bag afterwards and those who didn’t. The men who were prevented from punching the bag started to show acute signs of anxiety and distress from not being able to reconfirm their masculinity.
kqedscience:

Do pygmy seahorses search for a coral that matches their color, or do they change their color to match the coral? 
Learn more in Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage, the premiere video for our new science series, Deep Look. Watch on Tuesday, October 21.
Created by KQED Public Media in San Francisco and presented by pbsdigitalstudios.

kqedscience:

Do pygmy seahorses search for a coral that matches their color, or do they change their color to match the coral?

Learn more in Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage, the premiere video for our new science series, Deep Look. Watch on Tuesday, October 21.

Created by KQED Public Media in San Francisco and presented by pbsdigitalstudios.

korranation:

beroberos:

toph’s first snapchats

THESE ARE SO GOOD

biodiverseed:

fuckyeahpermaculture:

Geoff Lawton discovers an oasis in the middle of the Sonoran desert in Arizona. The system was created 80 years ago. Built during the Roosevelt era, the system was designed to passively harvest water and build soil without human assistance. We could regreen a lot of deserts this way.”


Watch the full movie at http://www.GeoffLawton.com

#permaculture #arid #videos #Arizona

prostheticknowledge:

Programmable Materials

Project by Skylar Tibbits for MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab explores materials that can alter their shape under certain conditions, from carbon fiber and fabric to woodgrain:

Programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly.  These new materials include: self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material.

Nearly every industry has long desired smarter materials and robotic-like transformation from apparel, architecture, product design and manufacturing to aerospace and automotive industries. However, these capabilities have often required expensive, error-prone and complex electromechanical devices (motors, sensors, electronics), bulky components, power consumption (batteries or electricity) and difficult assembly processes. These constraints have made it difficult to efficiently produce dynamic systems, higher-performing machines and more adaptive products, until now. Our goal is true material robotics or robots without robots.

A couple of examples - here is a proof-of-concept adaptive airfoil which does not require any additional mechanical parts:

Here is a proof of concept demonstration of ‘programmable wood’:

More about this project can be found here